A Delay on 10, Missing Clubs, Toms Wins Senior U.S. Open, Tiger Takes Shot at USGA

By | July 2, 2018

Dahmen calls out playing partner: ‘Kang cheated’ | by Will Gray for GolfChannel.com

The dispute eventually included a discussion with rules officials and led to a 25-minute delay according to Dahmen, to the point where the next group of Ben Crane and Ryan Palmer played through on No. 10.

With the two players left at an impasse, Kang was eventually allowed to drop near the green and ended up getting up and down to save par. He went on to shoot a bogey-free 64 that moved him into solo third place, earning a check of $482,800 and a spot in The Open later this month.

Whether in the right or not, no one can say Joel Dahmen wasn’t taking his responsibilities to protect the field seriously. Golf is a gentleman’s game. If Sung Kang feels the ruling was correct, and the local official agreed, that is the end of it. If there is evidence to the contrary, evidence that makes it clear that Kang was in the wrong and had a reasonable ability to realize it in the moment, then he will pay the price with a damaged reputation.


Graeme McDowell’s clubs go missing

We’ll see what Air France can do for McDowell in the few hours remaining but it isn’t looking good. I have to say that I agree with Brandon Poynter. Why not take a shot with a borrowed set of clubs? What’s the worst that can happen?


David Toms leans on memories to guide him to U.S. Senior Open victory | by Dave Shedloski for GolfDigest.com

“My emotions are all over the place,” said the Louisiana native, who won for the first time since the 2011 Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial, the last of his 13 tour titles. “It was just so hard. When you haven’t done it in a while, it’s pretty brutal. And I’m just glad I got it done.”

Always great to see a past champion fight his way back on top.


Did Tiger Woods just take a shot at the USGA? | by Ben Alberstadt for GolfWRX.com

“One of the neat things about playing an Open Championship — they don’t really care what par is. They just let whatever Mother Nature has — if it’s in store for a wet Open it is; if it’s dry it’s dry. They don’t try and manufacture an Open.”

I don’t think there’s much question that Tiger Woods was letting the USGA know they need to rethink their approach to course setup. It’s certainly a topic I’ve been pounding on for a while. Interesting though, it sounds like Tiger was taking the USGA to task more for watering the course going into Sunday at Shinnecock Hills than for setting the course up too severly over the previous three days. Which seems reasonable. I can certainly see where the players would appreciate a consistent challenge over the 4-days as much as the natural weather conditional allow for. We’ll see if the USGA responds. I kind of doubt it.